Archives for posts with tag: photography

Photographer Martin Wilson, upon receiving his first camera at age 8, was given sage and ultimately prophetic advice by his father, “make every picture count.”  Wilson has been following his advice ever since.  His work is created frame by frame on 35mm film, a painstaking process whereby every frame from the roll is on display and every image has been shot in sequence.  The film is developed, scanned, and then pieced together digitally to make a large contact sheet.  Ultimately the contact sheet becomes the final piece of artwork.  He does not post process the film or digitally manipulate the images beyond arranging them side by side.  He calls the works “records of real journeys, the visual remnants of hours walking or cycling round town, bringing to life unheard of voices of the city.”  Martin Wilson is currently on exhibit at the London Tap Gallery in Altrincham, Cheshire.

My Burden is Light by Martin Wilson

Modern Art by Martin Wilson

Red Letter Days by Martin Wilson

Message from the Bears by Martin Wilson

Look Both Ways by Martin Wilson

For more information about purchasing the work, visit the artist’s website.

-Jayme Catalano

Susan Mikula uses expired and aged Polaroid film found at rummage sales to capture images of decimated Americana, ghostly figures, and haunting landscapes.  Like the badly outdated film itself, the images tell a story of the American Dream gone sour.  As her website describes, “Mikula has captured a fading aspect of a bygone era with fading film and an obsolete technology.”  Whether derelict and deserted industrial buildings, docks, or houses, the images all evoke the same feeling of barely remembered, semi-coherent dreams and memories. Mikula’s work is showing in Secretly Seeking at the Curatorium in Hudson, New York.

Susan Mikula

Susan Mikula, desidero 01

Susan Mikula, american vale

Susan Mikula, desidero 44

-Jayme Catalano

Oscar Wilde once said, “Consistency is the last refuge of the unimaginative.”  He also said, “Anyone who lives within their means suffers from a lack of imagination.”  Clearly a bit concerned with imagination or a lack thereof, Oscar Wilde would surely have approved of San Francisco based interior designer Ken Fulk, a man who clearly possesses imagination in spades.  His own loft above his design studio in SoMa is punctuated with unique and tasteful pieces of contemporary and classic fine art, bold colors, and varied texture.  Recently photographed by Philip Harvey for the blog Style Saloniste, the loft is an inspiration to those wishing to avoid the boring, unimaginative, or consistent.  Moreover, it is a veritable pantheon devoted to eclecticism and taste.  For more of Ken Fulk’s designs, visit his website.  For more of Philip Harvey’s photography, click here.

Photography by Philip Harvey. Design by Ken Fulk.

-Jayme Catalano

Photograph by Philip Harvey. Design by Ken Fulk.

Photography by Philip Harvey. Design by Ken Fulk.

Photograph by Philip Harvey. Design by Ken Fulk.

Lee Jung is a rare combination of poet and visual artist.  Her C-type photographs often feature large, neon poems against a serene natural environment.  In the work “To Death,” the neon words read, “With my soul in your eyes to eternity as you are inside me at first sight your name I swear take my all thinking of you to death.”  Her statements are often political and many of the photographs are taken on the border of North Korea.  Jung was educated at the Royal College of Art in the United Kingdom and was recently featured in the “Chaotic Harmony” photography exhibition at the Houston Museum of Fine Arts.  You can view more of her work here.

To Death by Jung Lee, 2010

Why? by Jung Lee, 2010

How Could You Do This To Me by Jung Lee, 2010

I Still Remember by Jung Lee, 2010

My Heart is Yours by Jung Lee, 2010

-Jayme Catalano

Image Blender for the iPhone is an ingenious little program that allows the user to blend two images together to create a trippy little masterpiece.  The $2 app offers endless possibilities for layering, masking, and filtering, all with a single swipe of a finger, simplifying an otherwise complicated and time consuming process in Photoshop.  To purchase, visit the iTunes Store.

-Jayme Catalano

David Karvasales is the rare photographer today who is moving away from digital and back to analog technology.  He is also extremely conscious of theme and story in his collections, not one to hastily snap random images hoping for cohesion later.  His most recent body of work, Hana, explores the idea of spontaneity, adventure, kismet, and youthful optimism.  You can view more of David’s work here or here.

Hana by David Karvasales

Hana by David Karvasales

Hana by David Karvasales

Hana by David Karvasales

Follow David on Twitter.

-Jayme Catalano

 

 

RH Alexander creates images as disparate as Buddhist monks in Tibet, Occupy protestors in San Francisco, still life studies,  and stunning California landscapes.  With a Ph.D in psychology as well as intensive training in newspaper journalism, he brings a deeply analytical and technical eye to his work.  He says, “Photographs capture stillness in movement-a gift that allows us to stop time and deeply enter the visual world.  But great photographs also capture movement in stillness.  Within the image, one can sense something about to happen, something coming to life or passing away.”  The images below are from his California Landscape series.  You can view more from this series and others on his website.

Dawn, near Mono Lake by RH Alexander Photography

Last Sunset by RH Alexander Photography

Sunset over San Francisco by RH Alexander Photography

Canary Public Relations is proud to announce that they will be representing RH Alexander Photography.

-Jayme Catalano