Archives for posts with tag: painting

Barcelona based artist Guim Tio Zarraluki distills the complex curves of the human figure into basic, single plane geometry.  His subjects are clown-like, comical yet strangely haunting figures with obscured eyes and lifelike lips against matte backgrounds.  He often paints over magazine editorials and one can see the ghostly outline of  fashion models and text.  He recently released a video illustrating his technique using an image of Paul Newman.  Click here to learn more about the artist.

Guun Tui Zarraluki

Guim Tio Zarraluki

Guim Tio Zarraluki

Guim Tio Zarraluki

-Jayme Catalano

The Art WithOut Labels retail gallery is a hip space filled with the artwork of emerging local and international artists.  Created by artists and designers with developmental and related disabilities, much of the work is slightly irreverent and endearingly whimsical.  Started by the non-profit group Alchemia, AWOL empowers artists and provides an opportunity for the community to recognize and support their astounding talent.  The mission of AWOL is “to create a public venue where the intersection of people, media, and invention help to create a more open and inviting community for all.”  AWOL’s artists are talented and unique and their artwork is a reminder that artistry transcends limitations.

If you would like to inquire about purchasing artwork or donating funds to the non-profit organization, please contact Susan Boyle at (415) 320-2126 or email susan[at]alchemia.org.  You can visit the website here.

Bird on Branch, courtesy of the AWOL Gallery

Courtesy of the AWOL Gallery

Courtesy of the AWOL Gallery

Courtesy of the AWOL Gallery

Looking at Richard Diebenkorn’s geometrical, abstract paintings, one might assume he had been inspired by architecture and the straight lines of civilization and modernity.  His inspiration, however, came from the natural, rolling hillside he could see from his studio window.  As Susan Stamberg says in her NPR piece on the artist, “Diebenkorn, looking up at the Ocean Park hills through his studio’s big windows, didn’t paint the landscape; he painted the quality of light on the landscape, framed by the angled geometry of those windows.”  The Orange County Museum of Art is currently staging the first major exhibition of the artist’s celebrated Ocean Park Series through May 27th.

Ocean Park #79 by Richard Diebenkorn

For more information on the exhibition, visit the museum website; for more on the artist, click here.

-Jayme Catalano

Chilean artist Santiago Salvador paints images of tiny, anonymous people often arranged in patterns reminiscent of traditional South American weaving.  “I think of my paintings and drawings as constructions.  I include recognizable elements in them and others that are not, creating a composition in a way loses a narrative logic, but maintains in itself a friendly and mysterious stability.  I think that painting and illustrations are a gateway to the recognizable, the intimate and the ambiguous that surround us.”

Santiago Salvador

Santiago Salvador

Santiago Salvador

For more of Salvador’s images, visit his Flickr site or his blog.

-Jayme Catalano

Unlike many artists, Ed Handelman finds it difficult to discuss his work.  “I’ve always found it hard to make statements about my art.  It implies that there is some kind of philosophy behind my work; I just like painting.”  A number of his paintings are also untitled.  Based in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco, his work is currently on exhibition at Nieto Fine Art.

Untitled by Ed Handelman

For more information about the artist, visit his website or Nieto Fine Art.

-Jayme Catalano

Stephan Balleux’s edgy sculpture ‘Bullet Proof’s Anatomy’ challenges our notions of infallibility and invulnerability, mocking modern technology’s promise of safety and order.  Nothing is bullet proof, nothing is invincible; no matter how we comfort ourselves with Kevlar, we are mortal and we will die.  And yet the skull is dripping in cheerful, vibrant, beautiful colors, as though to remind us that there is beauty in fragility.  A Belgian artist based in Germany, Balleux was recently the artist in residence at WARDLOW in Australia.

Bullet Proof's Anatomy by Stephan Balleux

For more information, visit Stephan Balleux’s website.

-Jayme Catalano

Inspired by Anna Utopia Giordano’s ‘Venus’ project, I decided to apply today’s standard of beauty to Leonardo DaVinci’s Mona Lisa.  I plumped her lips, made her eyes larger, slimmed and elongated her neck, trimmed her double chin, hands and arms, and removed the bags under her eyes.

Mona Lisa after a Photoshop transformation.

If you haven’t seen it yet, the Dove Evolution video illustrates the extent of Photoshop in advertising today.

-Jayme Catalano

Salvador Dali once said, “The hand of the chimpanzee is quasi-human; the hand of Jackson Pollock is totally animal.”  Whether done for fundraising purposes, research, or for entertainment, zoos throughout the world have long placed human art supplies and tools in the hands, trunks and paws of their wards; the resulting works resemble modern art to some, childish scribbling to many, and fine art to others.  There is evidence that monkeys were painting in the 17th century, although the art wasn’t given much attention until the emergence of the modern art movement.  Elephants are particularly suited to it: picking up sticks is a natural behavior.  Dolly, an Asian Elephant and a resident of the Denver zoo, regularly creates splashy canvases that are auctioned off for as much as $1400.  The Grant Museum of Zoology in London is currently exhibiting a collection of artwork done by animals.

For more information, please visit BBC News, the Telegraph, or the Denver Zoo.

Sifting through the boatloads of visual information stored on the intertubes today, I came across the artwork of John Squire.  Best known for his recently re-united Britpop band The Stone Roses,  Squire is also highly collectable painter.  Working in the mixed media of ink and oil, Squire’s works bring to mind the elaborate mosaics of Islamic mosques.  Often titled with names of well-known figures of popular culture, Squire chooses his subjects based on their place “in the history of phenomena” of fame and celebrity.  Ranging from Harry Houdini to Rihanna, Squire has “tried to select a broad range of personalities and not just reflect my tastes.”  His work was  most recently exhibited at The Idea Generation Gallery in London.

John Squire's ink and oil paintings. From top left, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Josef Fritzl, Woody Allen, Self Portrait. Images courtesy of http://www.johnsquire.com

Please visit johnsquire.com for more information.

-Jayme Catalano

I recently became aware of Andy Warhol’s Rorschach paintings.  Completed toward the end of his career, they are a stark departure from the celebrity focused screen prints he is most closely associated with.  As Mia Fineman has said in Artnet.com Magazine, they “have the kind of star quality that Warhol always admired. Liquid, protean and seductively vacant, they reflect your own desires and fantasies right back at you.”  A large collection of Andy Warhol’s work is currently on exhibit at the ArtScience Museum in Singapore.

Paintings from Andy Warhol's Rorschach series. Clockwise from left, image courtesy of warhol.org, brooklynmuseum.org, and artnet.com

Visit Artnet.com for more information regarding the series.

-Jayme Catalano