Archives for posts with tag: New York

Susan Mikula uses expired and aged Polaroid film found at rummage sales to capture images of decimated Americana, ghostly figures, and haunting landscapes.  Like the badly outdated film itself, the images tell a story of the American Dream gone sour.  As her website describes, “Mikula has captured a fading aspect of a bygone era with fading film and an obsolete technology.”  Whether derelict and deserted industrial buildings, docks, or houses, the images all evoke the same feeling of barely remembered, semi-coherent dreams and memories. Mikula’s work is showing in Secretly Seeking at the Curatorium in Hudson, New York.

Susan Mikula

Susan Mikula, desidero 01

Susan Mikula, american vale

Susan Mikula, desidero 44

-Jayme Catalano

New York based Kumiya Mashita is a shadow artist, juxtaposing tactile objects with ghostlike shadow forms.  The effect is something out of an art house horror movie or a fever dream.  Her illusions emerge from the darkness, deliberately carved wood and carefully placed illumination forming the basis of her installations.  Called a “magician of shadow” in her native Japan, Mashita also creates intricate portraits using unconventional techniques:  in one work, she has removed strategic threads from woven cloth to create a detailed portrait of a young boy.

Chair, 2010. By Kumi Yamashita.

Seated Figure, 2008. Kumi Yamashita.

Warp and Weft (Mana), 2007. Kumi Yamashita.

Visit KumiYamashita.com for more information.  Watch this video about her work.

Ran Hwang, a Korean born artist based in New York, creates large scale art installations using only clothing notions.  Buttons and thread are connected and anchored to thousands of pins hammered into the wall.  Hwang wishes to suggest “connections between human beings and a communication network between seemingly unlinked human experiences.  The filled negative space in the absence of the positive space suggests mortality at the heart of self-recognition.”  Her work has taken the minutiae and ephemera of “a woman’s work” and transformed it into daring, aggressive, and beautiful works of thoroughly liberated art.

For more information, visit RanHwang.com.

-Jayme Catalano