Archives for posts with tag: fashion

David Karvasales is the rare photographer today who is moving away from digital and back to analog technology.  He is also extremely conscious of theme and story in his collections, not one to hastily snap random images hoping for cohesion later.  His most recent body of work, Hana, explores the idea of spontaneity, adventure, kismet, and youthful optimism.  You can view more of David’s work here or here.

Hana by David Karvasales

Hana by David Karvasales

Hana by David Karvasales

Hana by David Karvasales

Follow David on Twitter.

-Jayme Catalano

 

 

Inspired by Anna Utopia Giordano’s ‘Venus’ project, I decided to apply today’s standard of beauty to Leonardo DaVinci’s Mona Lisa.  I plumped her lips, made her eyes larger, slimmed and elongated her neck, trimmed her double chin, hands and arms, and removed the bags under her eyes.

Mona Lisa after a Photoshop transformation.

If you haven’t seen it yet, the Dove Evolution video illustrates the extent of Photoshop in advertising today.

-Jayme Catalano

As the media loves to point out, our perceptions of realistic, attainable beauty standards have been radically changed by the ubiquity of Photoshop, adolescent runway models, and deceptive advertising.  What if the aesthetic standards of  our modern society had belonged to the great artists of the past?  Italian fashion model and artist Anna Utopia Giordano has created ‘Venus’, ten works that combine aesthetic harmony with the contemporary eye.  She has transformed classic Zaftig representations of the goddess Venus into slender, slim-waisted, busty waifs.  The result is strangely haunting.

Anna Utopia Giordano's Photoshop transformations of classic masterpieces are on the right. From top The Birth of Venus by Alexandre Cabanel, The Birth of Venus by Botticelli, Venus at her Mirror by Diego Velazquez, The Sleeping Venus by Artemisia Gentilischi.

For more information, please visit Giordano’s website.

-Jayme Catalano

Ran Hwang, a Korean born artist based in New York, creates large scale art installations using only clothing notions.  Buttons and thread are connected and anchored to thousands of pins hammered into the wall.  Hwang wishes to suggest “connections between human beings and a communication network between seemingly unlinked human experiences.  The filled negative space in the absence of the positive space suggests mortality at the heart of self-recognition.”  Her work has taken the minutiae and ephemera of “a woman’s work” and transformed it into daring, aggressive, and beautiful works of thoroughly liberated art.

For more information, visit RanHwang.com.

-Jayme Catalano