Nick Cann began his career as a set illustrator at MGM Studios during the Golden Age of cinema, later branching out to set and credit designs for television and film.  Using Sharpie markers and pens, Cann creates whimsical worlds with a unique style reminiscent of Naiad and Walter Einsel or Aubrey Beardsley.  Cann, perfecting his art for more than sixty years, says “I like to draw.  I have been drawing for as long as I can remember.  My interests are fantasy people and detailed architectural confections.”    Based in Napa, California, his works are available for sale through his website.

Nick Cann

Nick Cann

Nick Cann

Nick Cann

Nick Cann

-Jayme Catalano

Sylvester Stallone once said that, “if bad decorating was a hanging offense, there’d be bodies hanging from every tree.”  Luckily it’s not, and even if it was, interior designer David Oldroyd would not be among the casualties.  He recently completed a modernist renovation of a thirties townhouse that perfectly combines the crisp edge of modernism with the warmth of natural materials.  Located in the hills above the Castro district in San Francisco, the interior is a light-filled, purist canvas perfect for its vintage furniture, rare collections, and sensual sculptures.  Visit the Style Saloniste for additional photographs of the house.  You can view more of photographer Philip Harvey’s work at his website.

Photo by Philip Harvey.

Photo by Philip Harvey

Photo by Philip Harvey

Photo by Philip Harvey

Photo by Philip Harvey

-Jayme Catalano

The Art WithOut Labels retail gallery is a hip space filled with the artwork of emerging local and international artists.  Created by artists and designers with developmental and related disabilities, much of the work is slightly irreverent and endearingly whimsical.  Started by the non-profit group Alchemia, AWOL empowers artists and provides an opportunity for the community to recognize and support their astounding talent.  The mission of AWOL is “to create a public venue where the intersection of people, media, and invention help to create a more open and inviting community for all.”  AWOL’s artists are talented and unique and their artwork is a reminder that artistry transcends limitations.

If you would like to inquire about purchasing artwork or donating funds to the non-profit organization, please contact Susan Boyle at (415) 320-2126 or email susan[at]alchemia.org.  You can visit the website here.

Bird on Branch, courtesy of the AWOL Gallery

Courtesy of the AWOL Gallery

Courtesy of the AWOL Gallery

Courtesy of the AWOL Gallery

Lee Jung is a rare combination of poet and visual artist.  Her C-type photographs often feature large, neon poems against a serene natural environment.  In the work “To Death,” the neon words read, “With my soul in your eyes to eternity as you are inside me at first sight your name I swear take my all thinking of you to death.”  Her statements are often political and many of the photographs are taken on the border of North Korea.  Jung was educated at the Royal College of Art in the United Kingdom and was recently featured in the “Chaotic Harmony” photography exhibition at the Houston Museum of Fine Arts.  You can view more of her work here.

To Death by Jung Lee, 2010

Why? by Jung Lee, 2010

How Could You Do This To Me by Jung Lee, 2010

I Still Remember by Jung Lee, 2010

My Heart is Yours by Jung Lee, 2010

-Jayme Catalano

Painter Michelle Armas lasted one year in the stressful world of corporate branding in New York before she decamped back to Atlanta to pursue a career in abstract painting.  Her large scale acrylics are vibrant, bold, and youthful, the hipster offspring of  Richard Diebenkorn and Jackson Pollock.  In a recent posting on her blog about a commission she is completing for a very symmetrical bedroom, she describes her creative process in endearingly straightforward terms:  “I think there should be big shapes, lots of layering but chunky and scribbly to balance the linear-ness all over the place.”  Visit her blog to see the result.  Click here to visit her online gallery.

Fly By, Michelle Armas

Apple, Michelle Armas

Secret umbrellas, Michelle Armas

-Jayme Catalano

It is ironic that artist Vanessa Cooper shares her name with an adult film star because her charming paintings are the embodiment of innocence.  Hampshire born, raised and based, her often idyllic works feature scenes from life in the English countryside painted in a style reminiscent of folk art.  Bold colors and humorous compositions bring to mind naive painters Maud Lewis, Seraphine Louis, and John Kane.  Coooper accepts commissions and more of her work is available on her website.

Vanessa Cooper

Vanessa Cooper

Vanessa Cooper

Vanessa Cooper

Vanessa Cooper

Vanessa Cooper

Vanessa Cooper

Vanessa Cooper

-Jayme Catalano

In his Map Works series, Dallas-based artist Matthew Cusick has created intricate collages out of maps and acrylic paint.  Echoing traditional Japanese woodcuts in some and Lucian Freud in others, the images depict people and the natural world through the harsh lines and bold colors of maps.  It is almost as though humanity’s attempts to capture and illustrate the complexity of Earth with a series of spheres, borders, and grids is being reflected back as a truly futile mission.  For more information on the artist, please visit his website.

Bonnie, 2004 by Matthew Cusick

The Rachel’s Wave, 2011 by Matthew Cusick

Shauna, 2011 by Matthew Cusick

Fiona’s Wave, 2005 by Matthew Cusick

-Jayme Catalano

Graphic designer Paige Smith has created a street art project in the nooks and crannies of urban Los Angeles.  Working under the pseudonym A Common Name, her three dimensional paper objects represent crystal, quartz, and geodes, mineral formations normally found in nature.  The results are whimsical, mystical, and more than a little magical.  As she says, “A parallel aspect of these ‘geodes’ in nature and in the city is they are always unexpected treasures.  You might go hunting for treasures but you generally happen upon them during your adventures or casual interaction with the environment.”  Visit her website for information on the specific location of the geodes.

Geode #2, Arts District LA

Geode #2, Arts District LA by A Common Name

Geode #9, Downtown LA, A Common Name

Geode #10, Arts District, A Common Name

Geode #7, Daily Dose DTLA, A Common Name

A Common Name is also creating art in custom spaces, “less unexpected but equally beautiful.”  Contact her here for more information.

-Jayme Catalano

 

 

Artist Michael Carson creates large paintings that are a cross between Norman Rockwell and the moody Prada ads of the late 2000s.  His long-legged, gamine figures wear the visage of modern disaffected youth while trapped in a time period not quite our own.  The effect is mesmerizing.  Carson says, “I paint people because I have always had a serious addiction to watching people.  I try to get that feel in my paintings.  As if I am just watching people doing everyday things in my work.”  You can view Carson’s work at the Richard J. Demato gallery in Sag Harbor, New York or online here.

Barely Interested by Michael Carson

Breeze by Michael Carson

Michael Carson

Man in Jacket by Michael Carson

For more galleries exhibiting his work, click here or here.

-Jayme Catalano

With spring upon us, so, too, is the question of how best to appoint and decorate our outdoor living spaces.  Artist Tiffany Drage of Newport Beach offers an elegant and beautiful solution:  living pictures made of colorful succulents.  Perfect for small areas and blank vertical walls, her succulent wall art is a low maintenance alternative to traditional potted plants and a way to bring a feeling of refinement to the great outdoors.  If you are more inclined toward DIY, see Sunset Magazine’s excellent instruction guide to creating your own.

Vertical succulent wall art by Tiffany Drage

Succulent wall art by Tiffany Drage

To purchase a bespoke original by Tiffany Drage, visit her Etsy store front TiffanysLivingArt.