Archives for category: Graphic Design

When independent game developer John Nelson Rose approached me about branding, marketing, and designing the user interface for his new puzzle game, I couldn’t have been more thrilled. The task granted me the opportunity to combine my skills in graphic design with interactivity while challenging me in ways I had never imagined.

I started the process by thinking about names for the game. It was important to the developer that the title be simple, relatively short, and very descriptive of the game play itself. The central game mechanic is moving columns and rows of colored circles left and right, up and down to make two-by-two (or larger) squares. The name “Circle Squared” seemed the most fitting.

Once the name had been settled upon, I moved forward with designing the look and feel of the game. Inspired by a mid-century, minimalist design aesthetic, I settled upon using the font Century Gothic in white against black, all lower case with certain of the round spaces filled in with coordinating colored circles. The resulting menu and in-game screens are minimalist and very bold.

Establishing a color story that was pleasing to the eye and true to the branding of the game proved to be a bit of a trial and error process. In addition to coordinating beautiful colors that showed well against a saturated black background, I also had to make sure that the order in which the colors appeared in progressing difficulty levels was finely-tuned to avoid certain combinations. The resulting palette of plum, canary yellow, salmon pink, avocado green, cool red, warm baby blue, tangerine, and denim blue has been universally praised by those who have played the game.  If you don’t believe me, download the game and see for yourself.

While it’s a small start, I’m so excited to have officially launched my “indie” game career and I look forward to future collaborations.  Check out John’s website for details on upcoming title releases.

-Jayme Catalano

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German artist Catrin Welz-Stein creates her works by digitally collaging old illustrations and photographs.   She combines, divides, removes, fills and retouches elements in Adobe Photoshop to produce digital images that explore the worlds of fantasy and fairy tale.  She says her images, “speak from inner feelings which we often hide in our daily life.”  A former professional graphic art designer, she feels free from the rules and compromises she felt in creating art for clients.  She now enjoys “creating art that does not explain itself from the beginning.”  Based in Malaysia, she says “a large part of my work is the search for license-free images, illustrations or photophos, for which the copyright has long expired.  Old books, magazines and the Internet are my primary resources for that.  Once I have found a fitting image, I break it into pieces, until the original image is no longer recognizable and an entirely new image is created.”  Visit her website to see more of her images or purchase the artwork at Redbubble.

Summer Dreaming by Catrin Welz-Stein

Summer Dreaming by Catrin Welz-Stein

Bye Bye Butterfly by Catrin Welz-Stein

Bye Bye Butterfly by Catrin Welz-Stein

Frau Holle by Catrin Welz-Stein

Frau Holle by Catrin Welz-Stein

She Took Her Wings and Walked by Catrin Welz-Stein

She Took Her Wings and Walked by Catrin Welz-Stein

Her Garden by Catrin Welz-Stein

Her Garden by Catrin Welz-Stein

Peacock by Catrin Welz-Stein

Peacock by Catrin Welz-Stein

Autumn by Catrin Welz-Stein

Autumn by Catrin Welz-Stein

-Jayme Catalano

Photographer Martin Wilson, upon receiving his first camera at age 8, was given sage and ultimately prophetic advice by his father, “make every picture count.”  Wilson has been following his advice ever since.  His work is created frame by frame on 35mm film, a painstaking process whereby every frame from the roll is on display and every image has been shot in sequence.  The film is developed, scanned, and then pieced together digitally to make a large contact sheet.  Ultimately the contact sheet becomes the final piece of artwork.  He does not post process the film or digitally manipulate the images beyond arranging them side by side.  He calls the works “records of real journeys, the visual remnants of hours walking or cycling round town, bringing to life unheard of voices of the city.”  Martin Wilson is currently on exhibit at the London Tap Gallery in Altrincham, Cheshire.

My Burden is Light by Martin Wilson

Modern Art by Martin Wilson

Red Letter Days by Martin Wilson

Message from the Bears by Martin Wilson

Look Both Ways by Martin Wilson

For more information about purchasing the work, visit the artist’s website.

-Jayme Catalano

Nick Cann began his career as a set illustrator at MGM Studios during the Golden Age of cinema, later branching out to set and credit designs for television and film.  Using Sharpie markers and pens, Cann creates whimsical worlds with a unique style reminiscent of Naiad and Walter Einsel or Aubrey Beardsley.  Cann, perfecting his art for more than sixty years, says “I like to draw.  I have been drawing for as long as I can remember.  My interests are fantasy people and detailed architectural confections.”    Based in Napa, California, his works are available for sale through his website.

Nick Cann

Nick Cann

Nick Cann

Nick Cann

Nick Cann

-Jayme Catalano

Graphic designer Paige Smith has created a street art project in the nooks and crannies of urban Los Angeles.  Working under the pseudonym A Common Name, her three dimensional paper objects represent crystal, quartz, and geodes, mineral formations normally found in nature.  The results are whimsical, mystical, and more than a little magical.  As she says, “A parallel aspect of these ‘geodes’ in nature and in the city is they are always unexpected treasures.  You might go hunting for treasures but you generally happen upon them during your adventures or casual interaction with the environment.”  Visit her website for information on the specific location of the geodes.

Geode #2, Arts District LA

Geode #2, Arts District LA by A Common Name

Geode #9, Downtown LA, A Common Name

Geode #10, Arts District, A Common Name

Geode #7, Daily Dose DTLA, A Common Name

A Common Name is also creating art in custom spaces, “less unexpected but equally beautiful.”  Contact her here for more information.

-Jayme Catalano

 

 

The Rice School of Architecture selected ring roads from two dozen international cities, layered the ring roads to the same scale, and color coded them for distinction.  The result is Ring Roads of the World, a beautifully graphic illustration of urban sprawl.  Prints are available through the school’s website.

Rice School of Architecture "Ring Roads of the World."

-Jayme Catalano

Fine Little Day, a Swedish store online, stocks whimsical, delightful, and interesting home goods, gifts, and jewelry.  Founded by artist Elisabeth Dunker, the company calls themselves a “sprawling and happily inconsistent company” with an ambition “to include art and design in your everyday, joyful life.”  In addition to their impeccable collection of textiles, wallpapers, ceramics, and books, the store stocks vintage birch bark shoes, mini lederhosen, art prints, and beautiful cutting boards.  Best of all, the store ships free worldwide.  Happy Shopping!

Cutting board by Elisabeth Dunker

Boabab by Elisabeth Dunker

Flaky Fields by Anna Backlund

Visit the store’s website for more information on purchasing.

-Jayme Catalano